Black Agenda Radio Commentaries
News, analysis and commentary on the human condition from a black left perspective.

A Black Agenda Radio commentary by Glen Ford

The Occupation of Harlem kicks off on October 28. “Black activists have a duty to engage the Occupation phenomenon as full actors, as the voices of the men, women and children that have suffered the most wrongs at the hands of Wall Street.” Frederick Douglass is a guide to how African Americans should engage the white-iOccupy Harlem! No One Has Suffered More Than Us From Plutocracynitiated OWS phenomenon. “If it is an awakening, then our voices need to be in the ears of all those who are waking up, Blacks, whites, Latinos, everyone.”

 

Occupy Harlem! No One Has Suffered More Than Us From Plutocracy

A Black Agenda Radio commentary by Glen Ford

There’s a desperate need to focus on Wall Street’s total economic strangulation of our communities.”

In 1847, in the first issue of the North Star, Frederick Douglass explained his decision to publish his own newspaper, rather than rely solely on The Liberatorand other publications of the white-led abolitionist movement. Douglass, who was then only 29 years old, wrote: The man who has suffered the wrong is the man to demand the redress—the man struck is the man to CRY OUT…!” These words can inform and guide us, today, as African Americans consider their relationship to the Occupy Wall Street movement, a mostly white-initiated grassroots upswelling that has captured the national imagination like no political phenomenon in more than 40 years.

Frederick Douglass did not launch his newspaper in order to split from white abolitionists, but to speak to and for slaves and free Blacks, to engage them directly in the great movement of the time: abolition. He remained an indispensable figure in the larger abolitionist structure, and was a staunch comrade to those whites that proved themselves capable of dealing with Black people, not simply on the basis of equality, but as the primary actors in the struggle for their own freedom. In time, it was Douglass’s words, his principled militancy, that animated the abolition movement and post-Civil War Radical Reconstruction.

In the same way, today’s Black activists have a duty to engage the Occupation phenomenon as full actors, as the voices of the men, women and children that have suffered the most wrongs at the hands of Wall Street and the oppressive forces that protect it, and who are the most in need of redress. It is our duty to be the ones to CRY OUT – as we always have, but this time in the midst of what we hope may be a national awakening. If it is an awakening, then our voices need to be in the ears of all those who are waking up, Blacks, whites, Latinos, everyone.

Rangel and too many other B

A Black Agenda Radio commentary by Glen Ford

The Occupation of Harlem kicks off on October 28. “Black activists have a duty to engage the Occupation phenomenon as full actors, as the voices of the men, women and children that have suffered the most wrongs at the hands of Wall Street.” Frederick Douglass is a guide to how African Americans should engage the white-initiated OWS phenomenon. “If it is an awakening, then our voices need to be in the ears of all those who are waking up, Blacks, whites, Latinos, everyone.”

 

Occupy Harlem! No One Has Suffered More Than Us From Plutocracy

A Black Agenda Radio commentary by Glen Ford

“There’s a desperate need to focus on Wall Street’s total economic strangulation of our communities.”

In 1847, in the first issue of the North Star, Frederick Douglass explained his decision to publish his own newspaper, rather than rely solely on The Liberator and other publications of the white-led abolitionist movement. Douglass, who was then only 29 years old, wrote: “The man who has suffered the wrong is the man to demand the redress—the man struck is the man to CRY OUT…!” These words can inform and guide us, today, as African Americans consider their relationship to the Occupy Wall Street movement, a mostly white-initiated grassroots upswelling that has captured the national imagination like no political phenomenon in more than 40 years.

Frederick Douglass did not launch his newspaper in order to split from white abolitionists, but to speak to and for slaves and free Blacks, to engage them directly in the great movement of the time: abolition. He remained an indispensable figure in the larger abolitionist structure, and was a staunch comrade to those whites that proved themselves capable of dealing with Black people, not simply on the basis of equality, but as the primary actors in the struggle for their own freedom. In time, it was Douglass’s words, his principled militancy, that animated the abolition movement and post-Civil War Radical Reconstruction.

In the same way, today’s Black activists have a duty to engage the Occupation phenomenon as full actors, as the voices of the men, women and child

A Black Agenda Radio commentary by Glen Ford

The Occupation of Harlem kicks off on October 28. “Black activists have a duty to engage the Occupation phenomenon as full actors, as the voices of the men, women and children that have suffered the most wrongs at the hands of Wall Street.” Frederick Douglass is a guide to how African Americans should engage the white-initiated OWS phenomenon. “If it is an awakening, then our voices need to be in the ears of all those who are waking up, Blacks, whites, Latinos, everyone.”

 

Occupy Harlem! No One Has Suffered More Than Us From Plutocracy

A Black Agenda Radio commentary by Glen Ford

“There’s a desperate need to focus on Wall Street’s total economic strangulation of our communities.”

In 1847, in the first issue of the North Star, Frederick Douglass explained his decision to publish his own newspaper, rather than rely solely on The Liberator and other publications of the white-led abolitionist movement. Douglass, who was then only 29 years old, wrote: “The man who has suffered the wrong is the man to demand the redress—the man struck is the man to CRY OUT…!” These words can inform and guide us, today, as African Americans consider their relationship to the Occupy Wall Street movement, a mostly white-initiated grassroots upswelling that has captured the national imagination like no political phenomenon in more than 40 years.

Frederick Douglass did not launch his newspaper in order to split from white abolitionists, but to speak to and for slaves and free Blacks, to engage them directly in the great movement of the time: abolition. He remained an indispensable figure in the larger abolitionist structure, and was a staunch comrade to those whites that proved themselves capable of dealing with Black people, not simply on the basis of equality, but as the primary actors in the struggle for their own freedom. In time, it was Douglass’s words, his principled militancy, that animated the abolition movement and post-Civil War Radical Reconstruction.

In the same way, today’s Black activists have a duty to engage the Occupation phenomenon as full actors, as the voices of the men, women and children that have suffered the most wrongs at the hands of Wall Street and the oppressive forces that protect it, and who are the most in need of redress. It is our duty to be the ones to CRY OUT – as we always have, but this time in the midst of what we hope may be a national awakening. If it is an awakening, then our voices need to be in the ear

A Black Agenda Radio commentary by Glen Ford

The Occupation of Harlem kicks off on October 28. “Black activists have a duty to engage the Occupation phenomenon as full actors, as the voices of the men, women and children that have suffered the most wrongs at the hands of Wall Street.” Frederick Douglass is a guide to how African Americans should engage the white-initiated OWS phenomenon. “If it is an awakening, then our voices need to be in the ears of all those who are waking up, Blacks, whites, Latinos, everyone.”

 

Occupy Harlem! No One Has Suffered More Than Us From Plutocracy

A Black Agenda Radio commentary by Glen Ford

“There’s a desperate need to focus on Wall Street’s total economic strangulation of our communities.”

In 1847, in the first issue of the North Star, Frederick Douglass explained his decision to publish his own newspaper, rather than rely solely on The Liberator and other publications of the white-led abolitionist movement. Douglass, who was then only 29 years old, wrote: “The man who has suffered the wrong is the man to demand the redress—the man struck is the man to CRY OUT…!” These words can inform and guide us, today, as African Americans consider their relationship to the Occupy Wall Street movement, a mostly white-initiated grassroots upswelling that has captured the national imagination like no political phenomenon in more than 40 years.

Frederick Douglass did not launch his newspaper in order to split from white abolitionists, but to speak to and for slaves and free Blacks, to engage them directly in the great movement of the time: abolition. He remained an indispensable figure in the larger abolitionist structure, and was a staunch comrade to those whites that proved themselves capable of dealing with Black people, not simply on the basis of equality, but as the primary actors in the struggle for their own freedom. In time, it was Douglass’s words, his principled militancy, that animated the abolition movement and post-Civil War Radical Reconstruction.

In the same way, today’s Bl

A Black Agenda Radio commentary by Glen Ford

The Occupation of Harlem kicks off on October 28. “Black activists have a duty to engage the Occupation phenomenon as full actors, as the voices of the men, women and children that have suffered the most wrongs at the hands of Wall Street.” Frederick Douglass is a guide to how African Americans should engage the white-initiated OWS phenomenon. “If it is an awakening, then our voices need to be in the ears of all those who are waking up, Blacks, whites, Latinos, everyone.”

 

Occupy Harlem! No One Has Suffered More Than Us From Plutocracy

A Black Agenda Radio commentary by Glen Ford

“There’s a desperate need to focus on Wall Street’s total economic strangulation of our communities.”

In 1847, in the first issue of the North Star, Frederick Douglass explained his decision to publish his own newspaper, rather than rely solely on The Liberator and other publications of the white-led abolitionist movement. Douglass, who was then only 29 years old, wrote: “The man who has suffered the wrong is the man to demand the redress—the man struck is the man to CRY OUT…!” These words can inform and guide us, today, as African Americans consider their relationship to the Occupy Wall Street movement, a mostly white-initiated grassroots upswelling that has captured the national imagination like no political phenomenon in more than 40 years.

Frederick Douglass did not launch his newspaper in order to split from white abolitionists, but to speak to and for slaves and free Blacks, to engage them directly in the great movement of the time: abolition. He remained an indispensable figure in the larger abolitionist structure, and was a staunch comrade to those whites that proved themselves capable of dealing with Black people, not simply on the basis of equality, but as the primary actors in the struggle for their own freedom. In time, it was Douglass’s words, his principled militancy, that animated the abolition movement and post-Civil War Radical Reconstruction.

In the same way, today’s Black activists have a duty to engage the Occupation phenomenon as full actors, as the voices of the men, women and children that have suffered the most wrongs at the hands of Wall Street and the oppressive forces that protect it, and who are the most in need of redress. It is our duty to be the ones to CRY OUT – as we always have, but this time in the midst of what we hope may be a national awakening. If it is an awakening, then our voices need to be in the ears of all those who are waking up, Blacks, whites, Latinos, everyone.

“Rangel and too many other Black officials are beholden to the very plutocrats that rule New York City and its political life.”

It’s time to Occupy Harlem. Harlem Fightback Against War at Home and Abroad, along with the Peoples Organization for Progress and others, will kick off the occupation process this Friday evening, October 28, with a mass meeting at St. Philips Church, on 134th Street, in Harlem. (See flyer, below.) Organizer Nellie Bailey says “there’s a desperate need to focus on Wall Street’s total economic strangulation of our communities.” That also requires confronting the “supine leadership of Black communities, not only in Harlem, but nationwide” – what we a Black Agenda Report call the “Black misleadership class.” In Harlem, that means Congressman Charles Rangel who, as Ms. Bailey puts it, “has been in office for well over 40 years, and has received more money from the real estate industry than any other person in Congress.” Rangel and too many other Black officials are beholden to the very plutocrats that rule New York City and its political life.

And so it goes in Black communities throughout the country. That’s why the People’s Organization for Progress has been demonstrating every day for more than 120 days – and will continue their daily protest in Newark, New Jersey for 381 days. And that’s why the Black Is Back Coalition was formed in September of 2009, and holds its national conference in Philadelphia on November 5. (See flyer, below.)

These organizations bring our people’s voices to the Occupation movement, and will continue whether that movement does, or not. Because, as Frederick Douglass said, “if there is no struggle, there is no progress.” For Black Agenda Radio, I’m Glen Ford. On the web, go to BlackAgendaReport.com.

BAR executive editor Glen Ford can be contact at Glen.Ford@BlackAgendaReport.com.

A Black Agenda Radio commentary by Glen Ford

The Occupation of Harlem kicks off on October 28. “Black activists have a duty to engage the Occupation phenomenon as full actors, as the voices of the men, women and children that have suffered the most wrongs at the hands of Wall Street.” Frederick Douglass is a guide to how African Americans should engage the white-initiated OWS phenomenon. “If it is an awakening, then our voices need to be in the ears of all those who are waking up, Blacks, whites, Latinos, everyone.”

 

Occupy Harlem! No One Has Suffered More Than Us From Plutocracy

A Black Agenda Radio commentary by Glen Ford

“There’s a desperate need to focus on Wall Street’s total economic strangulation of our communities.”

In 1847, in the first issue of the North Star, Frederick Douglass explained his decision to publish his own newspaper, rather than rely solely on The Liberator and other publications of the white-led abolitionist movement. Douglass, who was then only 29 years old, wrote: “The man who has suffered the wrong is the man to demand the redress—the man struck is the man to CRY OUT…!” These words can inform and guide us, today, as African Americans consider their relationship to the Occupy Wall Street movement, a mostly white-initiated grassroots upswelling that has captured the national imagination like no political phenomenon in more than 40 years.

Frederick Douglass did not launch his newspaper in order to split from white abolitionists, but to speak to and for slaves and free Blacks, to engage them directly in the great movement of the time: abolition. He remained an indispensable figure in the larger abolitionist structure, and was a staunch comrade to those whites that proved themselves capable of dealing with Black people, not simply on the basis of equality, but as the primary actors in the struggle for their own freedom. In time, it was Douglass’s words, his principled militancy, that animated the abolition movement and post-Civil War Radical Reconstruction.

In the same way, today’s Black activists have a duty to engage the Occupation phenomenon as full actors, as the voices of the men, women and children that have suffered the most wrongs at the hands of Wall Street and the oppressive forces that protect it, and who are the most in need of redress. It is our duty to be the ones to CRY OUT – as we always have, but this time in the midst of what we hope may be a national awakening. If it is an awakening, then our voices need to be in the ears of all those who are waking up, Blacks, whites, Latinos, everyone.

“Rangel and too many other Black officials are beholden to the very plutocrats that rule New York City and its political life.”

It’s time to Occupy Harlem. Harlem Fightback Against War at Home and Abroad, along with the Peoples Organization for Progress and others, will kick off the occupation process this Friday evening, October 28, with a mass meeting at St. Philips Church, on 134th Street, in Harlem. (See flyer, below.) Organizer Nellie Bailey says “there’s a desperate need to focus on Wall Street’s total economic strangulation of our communities.” That also requires confronting the “supine leadership of Black communities, not only in Harlem, but nationwide” – what we a Black Agenda Report call the “Black misleadership class.” In Harlem, that means Congressman Charles Rangel who, as Ms. Bailey puts it, “has been in office for well over 40 years, and has received more money from the real estate industry than any other person in Congress.” Rangel and too many other Black officials are beholden to the very plutocrats that rule New York City and its political life.

And so it goes in Black communities throughout the country. That’s why the People’s Organization for Progress has been demonstrating every day for more than 120 days – and will continue their daily protest in Newark, New Jersey for 381 days. And that’s why the Black Is Back Coalition was formed in September of 2009, and holds its national conference in Philadelphia on November 5. (See flyer, below.)

These organizations bring our people’s voices to the Occupation movement, and will continue whether that movement does, or not. Because, as Frederick Douglass said, “if there is no struggle, there is no progress.” For Black Agenda Radio, I’m Glen Ford. On the web, go to BlackAgendaReport.com.

BAR executive editor Glen Ford can be contact at Glen.Ford@BlackAgendaReport.com.

A Black Agenda Radio commentary by Glen Ford

The Occupation of Harlem kicks off on October 28. “Black activists have a duty to engage the Occupation phenomenon as full actors, as the voices of the men, women and children that have suffered the most wrongs at the hands of Wall Street.” Frederick Douglass is a guide to how African Americans should engage the white-initiated OWS phenomenon. “If it is an awakening, then our voices need to be in the ears of all those who are waking up, Blacks, whites, Latinos, everyone.”

 

Occupy Harlem! No One Has Suffered More Than Us From Plutocracy

A Black Agenda Radio commentary by Glen Ford

“There’s a desperate need to focus on Wall Street’s total economic strangulation of our communities.”

In 1847, in the first issue of the North Star, Frederick Douglass explained his decision to publish his own newspaper, rather than rely solely on The Liberator and other publications of the white-led abolitionist movement. Douglass, who was then only 29 years old, wrote: “The man who has suffered the wrong is the man to demand the redress—the man struck is the man to CRY OUT…!” These words can inform and guide us, today, as African Americans consider their relationship to the Occupy Wall Street movement, a mostly white-initiated grassroots upswelling that has captured the national imagination like no political phenomenon in more than 40 years.

Frederick Douglass did not launch his newspaper in order to split from white abolitionists, but to speak to and for slaves and free Blacks, to engage them directly in the great movement of the time: abolition. He remained an indispensable figure in the larger abolitionist structure, and was a staunch comrade to those whites that proved themselves capable of dealing with Black people, not simply on the basis of equality, but as the primary actors in the struggle for their own freedom. In time, it was Douglass’s words, his principled militancy, that animated the abolition movement and post-Civil War Radical Reconstruction.

In the same way, today’s Black activists have a duty to engage the Occupation phenomenon as full actors, as the voices of the men, women and child

A Black Agenda Radio commentary by Glen Ford

The Occupation of Harlem kicks off on October 28. “Black activists have a duty to engage the Occupation phenomenon as full actors, as the voices of the men, women and children that have suffered the most wrongs at the hands of Wall Street.” Frederick Douglass is a guide to how African Americans should engage the white-initiated OWS phenomenon. “If it is an awakening, then our voices need to be in the ears of all those who are waking up, Blacks, whites, Latinos, everyone.”

 

Occupy Harlem! No One Has Suffered More Than Us From Plutocracy

A Black Agenda Radio commentary by Glen Ford

“There’s a desperate need to focus on Wall Street’s total economic strangulation of our communities.”

In 1847, in the first issue of the North Star, Frederick Douglass explained his decision to publish his own newspaper, rather than rely solely on The Liberator and other publications of the white-led abolitionist movement. Douglass, who was then only 29 years old, wrote: “The man who has suffered the wrong is the man to demand the redress—the man struck is the man to CRY OUT…!” These words can inform and guide us, today, as African Americans consider their relationship to the Occupy Wall Street movement, a mostly white-initiated grassroots upswelling that has captured the national imagination like no political phenomenon in more than 40 years.

Frederick Douglass did not launch his newspaper in order to split from white abolitionists, but to speak to and for slaves and free Blacks, to engage them directly in the great movement of the time: abolition. He remained an indispensable figure in the larger abolitionist structure, and was a staunch comrade to those whites that proved themselves capable of dealing with Black people, not simply on the basis of equality, but as the primary actors in the struggle for their own freedom. In time, it was Douglass’s words, his principled militancy, that animated the abolition movement and post-Civil War Radical Reconstruction.

In the same way, today’s Black activists have a duty to engage the Occupation phenomenon as full actors, as the voices of the men, women and children that have suffered the most wrongs at the hands of Wall Street and the oppressive forces that protect it, and who are the most in need of redress. It is our duty to be the ones to CRY OUT – as we always have, but this time in the midst of what we hope may be a national awakening. If it is an awakening, then our voices need to be in the ears of all those who are waking up, Blacks, whites, Latinos, everyone.

“Rangel and too many other Black officials are beholden to the very plutocrats that rule New York City and its political life.”

It’s time to Occupy Harlem. Harlem Fightback Against War at Home and Abroad, along with the Peoples Organization for Progress and others, will kick off the occupation process this Friday evening, October 28, with a mass meeting at St. Philips Church, on 134th Street, in Harlem. (See flyer, below.) Organizer Nellie Bailey says “there’s a desperate need to focus on Wall Street’s total economic strangulation of our communities.” That also requires confronting the “supine leadership of Black communities, not only in Harlem, but nationwide” – what we a Black Agenda Report call the “Black misleadership class.” In Harlem, that means Congressman Charles Rangel who, as Ms. Bailey puts it, “has been in office for well over 40 years, and has received more money from the real estate industry than any other person in Congress.” Rangel and too many other Black officials are beholden to the very plutocrats that rule New York City and its political life.

And so it goes in Black communities throughout the country. That’s why the People’s Organization for Progress has been demonstrating every day for more than 120 days – and will continue their daily protest in Newark, New Jersey for 381 days. And that’s why the Black Is Back Coalition was formed in September of 2009, and holds its national conference in Philadelphia on November 5. (See flyer, below.)

These organizations bring our people’s voices to the Occupation movement, and will continue whether that movement does, or not. Because, as Frederick Douglass said, “if there is no struggle, there is no progress.” For Black Agenda Radio, I’m Glen Ford. On the web, go to BlackAgendaReport.com.

BAR executive editor Glen Ford can be contact at Glen.Ford@BlackAgendaReport.com.

ren that have suffered the most wrongs at the hands of Wall Street and the oppressive forces that protect it, and who are the most in need of redress. It is our duty to be the ones to CRY OUT – as we always have, but this time in the midst of what we hope may be a national awakening. If it is an awakening, then our voices need to be in the ears of all those who are waking up, Blacks, whites, Latinos, everyone.

“Rangel and too many other Black officials are beholden to the very plutocrats that rule New York City and its political life.”

It’s time to Occupy Harlem. Harlem Fightback Against War at Home and Abroad, along with the Peoples Organization for Progress and others, will kick off the occupation process this Friday evening, October 28, with a mass meeting at St. Philips Church, on 134th Street, in Harlem. (See flyer, below.) Organizer Nellie Bailey says “there’s a desperate need to focus on Wall Street’s total economic strangulation of our communities.” That also requires confronting the “supine leadership of Black communities, not only in Harlem, but nationwide” – what we a Black Agenda Report call the “Black misleadership class.” In Harlem, that means Congressman Charles Rangel who, as Ms. Bailey puts it, “has been in office for well over 40 years, and has received more money from the real estate industry than any other person in Congress.” Rangel and too many other Black officials are beholden to the very plutocrats that rule New York City and its political life.

And so it goes in Black communities throughout the country. That’s why the People’s Organization for Progress has been demonstrating every day for more than 120 days – and will continue their daily protest in Newark, New Jersey for 381 days. And that’s why the Black Is Back Coalition was formed in September of 2009, and holds its national conference in Philadelphia on November 5. (See flyer, below.)

These organizations bring our people’s voices to the Occupation movement, and will continue whether that movement does, or not. Because, as Frederick Douglass said, “if there is no struggle, there is no progress.” For Black Agenda Radio, I’m Glen Ford. On the web, go to BlackAgendaReport.com.

BAR executive editor Glen Ford can be contact at Glen.Ford@BlackAgendaReport.com.

ack activists have a duty to engage the Occupation phenomenon as full actors, as the voices of the men, women and children that have suffered the most wrongs at the hands of Wall Street and the oppressive forces that protect it, and who are the most in need of redress. It is our duty to be the ones to CRY OUT – as we always have, but this time in the midst of what we hope may be a national awakening. If it is an awakening, then our voices need to be in the ears of all those who are waking up, Blacks, whites, Latinos, everyone.

“Rangel and too many other Black officials are beholden to the very plutocrats that rule New York City and its political life.”

It’s time to Occupy Harlem. Harlem Fightback Against War at Home and Abroad, along with the Peoples Organization for Progress and others, will kick off the occupation process this Friday evening, October 28, with a mass meeting at St. Philips Church, on 134th Street, in Harlem. (See flyer, below.) Organizer Nellie Bailey says “there’s a desperate need to focus on Wall Street’s total economic strangulation of our communities.” That also requires confronting the “supine leadership of Black communities, not only in Harlem, but nationwide” – what we a Black Agenda Report call the “Black misleadership class.” In Harlem, that means Congressman Charles Rangel who, as Ms. Bailey puts it, “has been in office for well over 40 years, and has received more money from the real estate industry than any other person in Congress.” Rangel and too many other Black officials are beholden to the very plutocrats that rule New York City and its political life.

And so it goes in Black communities throughout the country. That’s why the People’s Organization for Progress has been demonstrating every day for more than 120 days – and will continue their daily protest in Newark, New Jersey for 381 days. And that’s why the Black Is Back Coalition was formed in September of 2009, and holds its national conference in Philadelphia on November 5. (See flyer, below.)

These organizations bring our people’s voices to the Occupation movement, and will continue whether that movement does, or not. Because, as Frederick Douglass said, “if there is no struggle, there is no progress.” For Black Agenda Radio, I’m Glen Ford. On the web, go to BlackAgendaReport.com.

BAR executive editor Glen Ford can be contact at Glen.Ford@BlackAgendaReport.com.

s of all those who are waking up, Blacks, whites, Latinos, everyone.

“Rangel and too many other Black officials are beholden to the very plutocrats that rule New York City and its political life.”

It’s time to Occupy Harlem. Harlem Fightback Against War at Home and Abroad, along with the Peoples Organization for Progress and others, will kick off the occupation process this Friday evening, October 28, with a mass meeting at St. Philips Church, on 134th Street, in Harlem. (See flyer, below.) Organizer Nellie Bailey says “there’s a desperate need to focus on Wall Street’s total economic strangulation of our communities.” That also requires confronting the “supine leadership of Black communities, not only in Harlem, but nationwide” – what we a Black Agenda Report call the “Black misleadership class.” In Harlem, that means Congressman Charles Rangel who, as Ms. Bailey puts it, “has been in office for well over 40 years, and has received more money from the real estate industry than any other person in Congress.” Rangel and too many other Black officials are beholden to the very plutocrats that rule New York City and its political life.

And so it goes in Black communities throughout the country. That’s why the People’s Organization for Progress has been demonstrating every day for more than 120 days – and will continue their daily protest in Newark, New Jersey for 381 days. And that’s why the Black Is Back Coalition was formed in September of 2009, and holds its national conference in Philadelphia on November 5. (See flyer, below.)

These organizations bring our people’s voices to the Occupation movement, and will continue whether that movement does, or not. Because, as Frederick Douglass said, “if there is no struggle, there is no progress.” For Black Agenda Radio, I’m Glen Ford. On the web, go to BlackAgendaReport.com.

BAR executive editor Glen Ford can be contact at Glen.Ford@BlackAgendaReport.com.

ren that have suffered the most wrongs at the hands of Wall Street and the oppressive forces that protect it, and who are the most in need of redress. It is our duty to be the ones to CRY OUT – as we always have, but this time in the midst of what we hope may be a national awakening. If it is an awakening, then our voices need to be in the ears of all those who are waking up, Blacks, whites, Latinos, everyone.

“Rangel and too many other Black officials are beholden to the very plutocrats that rule New York City and its political life.”

It’s time to Occupy Harlem. Harlem Fightback Against War at Home and Abroad, along with the Peoples Organization for Progress and others, will kick off the occupation process this Friday evening, October 28, with a mass meeting at St. Philips Church, on 134th Street, in Harlem. (See flyer, below.) Organizer Nellie Bailey says “there’s a desperate need to focus on Wall Street’s total economic strangulation of our communities.” That also requires confronting the “supine leadership of Black communities, not only in Harlem, but nationwide” – what we a Black Agenda Report call the “Black misleadership class.” In Harlem, that means Congressman Charles Rangel who, as Ms. Bailey puts it, “has been in office for well over 40 years, and has received more money from the real estate industry than any other person in Congress.” Rangel and too many other Black officials are beholden to the very plutocrats that rule New York City and its political life.

And so it goes in Black communities throughout the country. That’s why the People’s Organization for Progress has been demonstrating every day for more than 120 days – and will continue their daily protest in Newark, New Jersey for 381 days. And that’s why the Black Is Back Coalition was formed in September of 2009, and holds its national conference in Philadelphia on November 5. (See flyer, below.)

These organizations bring our people’s voices to the Occupation movement, and will continue whether that movement does, or not. Because, as Frederick Douglass said, “if there is no struggle, there is no progress.” For Black Agenda Radio, I’m Glen Ford. On the web, go to BlackAgendaReport.com.

BAR executive editor Glen Ford can be contact at Glen.Ford@BlackAgendaReport.com.

lack officials are beholden to the very plutocrats that rule New York City and its political life.”

It’s time to Occupy Harlem. Harlem Fightback Against War at Home and Abroad, along with the Peoples Organization for Progress and others, will kick off the occupation process this Friday evening, October 28, with a mass meeting at St. Philips Church, on 134th Street, in Harlem. (See flyer, below.) Organizer Nellie Bailey says “there’s a desperate need to focus on Wall Street’s total economic strangulation of our communities.” That also requires confronting the “supine leadership of Black communities, not only in Harlem, but nationwide” – what we a Black Agenda Report call the “Black misleadership class.” In Harlem, that means Congressman Charles Rangel who, as Ms. Bailey puts it, “has been in office for well over 40 years, and has received more money from the real estate industry than any other person in Congress.” Rangel and too many other Black officials are beholden to the very plutocrats that rule New York City and its political life.

And so it goes in Black communities throughout the country. That’s why the People’s Organization for Progress has been demonstrating every day for more than 120 days – and will continue their daily protest in Newark, New Jersey for 381 days. And that’s why the Black Is Back Coalition was formed in September of 2009, and holds its national conference in Philadelphia on November 5. (See flyer, below.)

These organizations bring our people’s voices to the Occupation movement, and will continue whether that movement does, or not. Because, as Frederick Douglass said, “if there is no struggle, there is no progress.” For Black Agenda Radio, I’m Glen Ford. On the web, go to BlackAgendaReport.com.

BAR executive editor Glen Ford can be contact atGlen.Ford@BlackAgendaReport.com.

Direct download: 20111026_gf_OccupyHarlemEtc.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 8:57am EDT

A Black Agenda Radio commentary by Glen Ford

Under drastically expanded rationales of national security and crime prevention, the FBI has empowered itself to massively penetrate and gather information on whole communities. In FBI-speak, these are called “domains” – “large geographic and social spaces in which national security demanded that the Bureau make itself acutely ‘aware.’” Wholesale targeting of these communities – an “industrial-strength” form of profiling – is justified on the assumption that “Blacks, Muslims (especially Black Muslims) and Latinos are more prone to crime and acts of terror.”

 

FBI “Mapping”: Racial Profiling on a People-Wide Scale

A Black Agenda Radio commentary by Glen Ford

A Black Separatist threat turned into an investigation of the growth characteristics of Blacks in the Atlanta area.”

Until the events of 9/11, Black America seemed to be winning lots of battles in the fight against racial profiling. The term “Driving While Black” had become almost a household word due to heavy media exposure of wildly disproportionate stops of Black drivers by police on Interstate highways. Racial profiling had become politically and socially unacceptable, with few public advocates even among law and order Republicans. And then the Twin Towers came down. Almost instantaneously, racial profiling was back, with a vengeance – directed most dramatically against people who “appeared” to be Muslim, whatever that looks like, but with renewed vigor against African Americans, the historical targets. The FBI, which was never a respecter of the rights of darker peoples, repositioned itself to aggressively pre-empt any threat to national security. That means going after people even when there is no evidence of a crime. Although it remained against the rules for FBI agents to launch investigations based solely on race, religion of ethnicity, those factors could be taken into account. It was a loophole big enough to drive a busload of Knights of the Ku Klux Klan through. By asserting that certain racial, religious and ethnic groups – Blacks, Muslims (especially Black Muslims) and Latinos – were more prone to crime and acts of terror, the FBI cold justify all manner of methods to massively penetrate these groups in the interest of national security.

The vocabulary changed to suit the mission. Ethnic, racial and religious communities became “domains” in FBI parlance, large geographic and social spaces in which national security demanded that the Bureau make itself acutely “aware.” Thus, the new strategy was called “domain awareness” – meaning, the FBI’s job was to learn everything about the people who lived in these ethnic, religious and racial “domains.” All that was required to launch massive intelligence gathering campaigns against, say, Black people in the state of Georgia, Arabs in the Detroit area, Chinese and Russians in the San Francisco Bay Area, or almost any group in New York City, was the invocation of a vague criminal or national security “threat.”

The Bureau is studying racial and ethnic ‘behaviors’ and ‘facilities.’”

Like magic, threats started appearing all over the place. In October 2009, the Atlanta office of the FBI sent out a threat “alert” about supposed “Black Separatist” groups. It turned out that the alert involved peaceful protests and support of a congressional candidate, but the FBI set about collecting information on the growth of the entire Black population in the Atlanta area, the better to understand the “domain.” The FBI has used the presence of street gangs like MS13 in some Latino communities to launch domain-wide dragnets of information on area Hispanic populations. Muslims of any extraction – but especially Black American Muslims – are considered domains worthy of endless mapping. According to the ACLU, which is urging people to tell the FBI “Don't Map Me or My Community,” the Bureau is studying racial and ethnic “behaviors.” That means “behaving while Black” - or behaving while Latino, or behaving while Muslim. The FBI also studies racial, ethnic and religious “facilities” - that is, the places where people...exist. The ACLU says the FBI's own behavior is unconstitutional. It also seems very much like the FBI is preparing to put the people it is studying under some kind of siege.

For Black Agenda Radio, I'm Glen Ford. On the web, go to BlackAgendaReport.com.

BAR executive editor Glen Ford can be contacted at Glen.Ford@BlackAgendaReport.com.

Direct download: 20111026_gf_FBImapping.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 8:47am EDT

A Black Agenda Radio commentary by editor and columnist Jared Ball

The experience of the last five weeks shows that Wall Street “occupiers’ fear of liberal co-optation is fully justified.” Media mogul and debit card finance capitalist Russell Simmons escorted Kanye West and Al Sharpton into the Zuccotti Park occupation mix, in yet another attempt “by the soft liberal Left to co-opt anything that has any degree of revolutionary potential.” Cooptation efforts are to be expected. However, “If the Simmons and Sharptons of the world are to be combated a more genuine Black leadership must emerge from the ranks of Black people.”

 

Russell Simmons Still Ain’t Hip-Hop and He Ain’t No Occupier Either!

A Black Agenda Radio commentary by editor and columnist Jared Ball

Simmons is the cultural version of the Black ‘misleadership class’ so often described in these pages.”

More than a decade ago Rosa Clemente alerted much of the world to the fact, as she said, that “Russell Simmons: You are Not Hip-Hop!” Her commentary caused a stir back then as many in the hip-hop community and beyond had taken a view of Simmons similar to the one many continue to have today of Barack Obama: A Black man who had taken over an aspect of the world mostly reserved for Whites and who would now make it better for us all. But in each case the man became the mirage he always was and in each case became a browner conduit of people’s hopes, dreams and, of course, money all of which continues to flow outwardly and only in benefit of the same White power elite. So it seemed perfect to see Simmons heckled at a recent Occupy Wall Street gathering and to note the particular Black womanhood of the leading heckler.

Initially the heckling occurred during a stand-up interview Simmons was giving from the crowd to CNN and the initial heckler was a White male challenging the hypocrisy of CNN conducting interviews about the occupation while having previously misreported the event. It was also sadly appropriate that it was Black on-lookers who attempted to defend Simmons’ right to speak. And that is what ultimately made the beauty of the sister’s interruption as she stepped in to say loud and clear to Simmons that, “you are part of the problem Russell!” Simmons is the cultural version of the Black “misleadership class” so often described in these pages. As Clemente pointed out ten years ago Simmons rose to prominence by promoting the worst forms of what he narrowly defined as hip-hop. From bling-bling to anti-human images of women and of Black and Brown people Simmons slung his wares in the streets and has been paid well for it. But he and his executive buddies used hip-hop and, as Clemente noted, “closed ranks” against the more radical and honest elements of the hip-hop community. He cut them off, refused support and used his position to reassure his sponsors and pacify his unwitting but frustrated supporters. And now his desire to bring Kanye West and Al Sharpton into the occupation mix had to be exposed for what it was and is; an attempt by the soft liberal Left to co-opt anything that has any degree of revolutionary potential.

The sister stepped in to say loud and clear to Simmons that, ‘you are part of the problem Russell!’”

And it is obvious in this case that the occupiers’ fear of liberal co-optation is fully justified. Simmons’ presence and his bringing the likes of West and Sharpton serves as a people’s testimony against themselves and stands in direct opposition to the involvement in the occupying movements of those like Rebel Diaz, Immortal Technique and Jasiri X. Simmons is there to be the hip-hop representation that negates today’s representatives of those he previously “closed ranks” against. And those who caught this travesty were right, from multiple angles, to challenge that. CNN would have to give him camera time as they would certainly want to convey his brand of hip-hop activism. He would have to be there to position himself, or be positioned, as an appropriate spokesperson for hip-hop, young people and, of course, all of the world’s colorful people. Simmons is no better than, and is indeed only a browner version of, the White liberals who are often criticized for their mostly White middle-class “occupations.” And this anonymous sister represents precisely why more Black and Brown people should be involved in these kinds of events but also why they need to be ardent supporters of their own more “indigenous” struggles and organizers.

That sister’s presence allowed for an important challenge to Black usurpers of Black radicalism and could serve as a reminder to White liberals that they too must beware of their own trappings and their own selections of those deemed appropriate representatives of blackness. And the very need for her role there speaks to the more important need of Black and Brown people to involve themselves in greater numbers in their own movement-building. If the Simmons and Sharptons of the world are to be combated a more genuine Black leadership must emerge from the ranks of Black people.

So, for just two examples, come out November 5 in Philadelphia and support the Black Is Back Coalition’s rally there to “Stop the Wars and Build the Resistance.” And then stand in solidarity with Mumia Abu-Jamal on the eve of International Human Rights Day on December 9, also in Philadelphia, as activists gather there to support political prisoners and an end to mass incarceration, prisons and the death penalty.

For Black Agenda Radio I’m Jared Ball. On the web go to BlackAgendaReport.com.

Dr. Jared A. Ball is an associate professor of communication studies at Morgan State University in Baltimore and is the author of I Mix What I Like! A Mixtape Manifesto (AK Press). He can be found online at: IMIXWHATILIKE.COM.


Direct download: 20111026_jb_RussellSimmonsOWS.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 8:32am EDT